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Chicago’s first hospice donates papers to UIC: ‘We existed for our patients and families’

UIC Student Lauren Janik (left) with Special Collections Librarian Megan Keller Young (center) and Joan Flanagan (right), a founding board member and longtime patient care volunteer of Horizon Hospice. Photo by Roberta Dupuis-Devlin.
UIC Student Lauren Janik (left) with Special Collections Librarian Megan Keller Young (center) and Joan Flanagan (right), a founding board member and longtime patient care volunteer of Horizon Hospice. Photo by Roberta Dupuis-Devlin.

By Carlos Sadovi, UIC Today

Several dozen people who had worked at or been impacted by the first hospice to open in Chicago were at the University of Illinois at Chicago recently to celebrate the role that Horizon Hospice played for hundreds of people and their families for more than 40 years.

In 1978, Horizon Hospice became Chicago’s first hospice when it admitted its first patient in 1978. Just a decade later, Horizon was serving 109 patients annually by the time the HIV/AIDS crisis was taking its toll, and it continued growing to about 2,000 patients by 2013, regardless of their ability to pay. In 2015, it merged with two suburban hospices to form JourneyCare Hospice and Palliative Care.

To celebrate the role Horizon Hospice played in the city and to share its history with researchers, officials have donated its archives to the University of Illinois at Chicago, which will house them in the Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago Special Collections and University Archives.

University Librarian and Dean of Libraries Mary Case thanked hospice founders for entrusting their archives to UIC. The collection was processed by Special Collections librarian Megan Keller Young and students Lauren Janik and Maria Vargas.

“Collections like this are a treasure trove for researchers investigating the story of care of the underserved and marginalized communities in our city, among many other topics,” Case said.

Read the full story on UIC Today

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